Tan Kim Her set to become Japan’s next men’s doubles coach

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Tan Kim Her (R) and Jeremy Gan chat during Japanese team's training session prior to the start of Malaysia Open on Tuesday. (photo: Sinchew)
Tan Kim Her (R) and Jeremy Gan chat during Japanese team's training session prior to the start of Malaysia Open on Tuesday. (photo: Sinchew)

Kuala Lumpur: When Malaysia’s Tan Kim Her stepped down abruptly from his post as India’s doubles badminton coach early March, there were speculations that he might have received some lucrative offer from another country, most likely Japan.

As it turned out, the rumors were true that Tan Kim Her has taken over the position vacated by Reony Mainaky who returned to the Badminton Association of Indonesia or PBSI to become their women’s singles head coach.

Tan Kim Her was the third Malaysian coach to join the Nippon Badminton Association after Jeremy Gan joined them early 2018 as Japan’s mixed doubles coach while Lee Wan Wah would begin coaching Japan’s junior players in April.

Although his official start date was April 1st, 2019, but he had already started working with the Japanese team since last week. Speaking to Malaysian media during Japan’s training session at the Academy Badminton Malaysia, Tan Kim Her said that he was honored to be part of the Japanese badminton team.

“This was a great opportunity for me and it was a difficult decision to leave India,” said Tan.

“Previously, I used to grow young players such as Lee Yong-Dae of Korea, Chris/Gabrielle Adcock of England and Goh V Shem of Malaysia. But it’s different now, because I was tasked to develop four established pairs (World No. 3 Takeshi Kamura/Keigo Sonoda, World No. 5 Hiroyuki Endo/Yuta Watanabe, World No. 12 Takuto Inoue-Yuki Kaneko, World No. 12 and World No. 24 Takuro Hoki/Yugo Kobayashi) to win medals at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics,” added Tan.

Jeremy Gan who has guided Yuta Watanabe/Arisa Higashino to become the World No. 3 mixed doubles pair (Yuta Watanabe/Arisa Higashino were ranked World No. 29 at the end of 2017), told Malaysian media that coaches from Malaysia were in high demand largely due to several factors.

“One of the many reasons why Malaysian coaches are popular is the timing. Secondly, we are extremely flexible, versatile and are also proficient in many languages. Thirdly, our coaching skills and game planning skills are very strong. Lastly, Malaysian coaches are eager to enrich our experience by coaching aboard,” said Gan.

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